Upcoming Exhibitions

The Red that Colored the WorldThe Red that Colored the World

January 21 - April 15, 2017

Organized by the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, The Red that Colored the World translates the cochineal story into three dimensions, following the precious bug juice and its use in art from Mexico and South America, to Europe, the U.S. and beyond. Highlighting textiles, sculpture, paintings, manuscripts, decorative arts, clothing and more—the exhibition explores the history of cochineal and the seductive visual nature of red. The objects reflect the unique international uses of color, revealing its role in the creative process and the motivations of artists in their choice of materials.

This exhibition has been organized by the Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe, NM with funding in part provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities, and is circulating through GuestCurator Traveling Exhibitions.

Image credit: Molleno, St. James, New Mexico, ca. 1805-1845. Water-based pigments on hide, 59 x 38 ¨ý x 1 ½ in. Museum of International Folk Art, Gift of the Historical Society of New Mexico. Courtesy Museum of International Folk Art. Photograph by Addison Doty.

Pan American Modernism: Avant Garde Art in Latin America and the United StatesPan American Modernism: Avant Garde Art in Latin America and the United States

April 29 - July 29, 2017

 Featuring the work of 43 Latin American artists and 26 artists from the United States, Pan American Modernism explores the rich visual dialogue that exists between objects produced by artists working in 13 countries in North, South, and Central America during the 60-year period between 1919 and 1979. Rather than perpetuating a North American-centric hegemony, which tends to diminish and polarize works of art produced by Latin American artists, the exhibition analyzes how Pan American artistic exchanges, rather than stylistic transmission, constructs a fuller understanding of modernism as an international phenomenon across the Americas.

Developed by the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami, Pan American Modernism showcases more than 70 important works of art, many of which have not been previously exhibited. Several influential Pan American artists are represented, including Eduardo Abela, Romare Bearden, Fernando Botero, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Joaquín Torres-García, Adolph Gottlieb, Hans Hofmann, Lee Krasner, Wifredo Lam, Roberto Matta, Robert Motherwell, Gordon Matta-Clark, Amelia Peláez, Man Ray, Diego Rivera, Ben Shahn, and Edward Weston among many others. The inclusion of such seminal artists allows for the examination of topics such as Mexican muralism, abstract expressionism, modernist photography, and geometric abstraction in constructivism, minimalism, and optical art to explore commonalities and disconnects throughout the Americas.

Curated by Dr. Nathan Timpano, Assistant Professor, Department of Art and HIstory, University of Miami, Pan American Modernism is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue published by Lowe Art Museum, with essays by Nathan Timpano, Edward J. Sullivan, and Heather Diack.

Image credit: José Mijares. Untitled. 1945. Oil on wood. Collection of Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami.